Arthrogram

You have been scheduled for an arthrogram study, which involves the use of a small amount of radioactive material. The level of radioactivity used is extremely low and has no side effects.

Preparation for the procedure:
There are no pre-exam instructions. You will be asked to drink six to eight glasses of liquid between the injection and the scan.

What to expect:
Once in the scan room you will lie down on a table and a gamma camera will be placed near the area of your body that the doctor is interested in. The camera does not produce any radiation, it simply records the signals from the radioactive compound. You will be intravenously injected with a radioactive tracer and scanned for approximately fifteen minutes. You will be asked to return two to four hours later for the scan. Once in the scan room you will lie down on a table a special detector called a gamma camera will be placed near the area of your body that the doctor is interested in. The scan takes approximately one hour.
You will then be sent to a radiologist’s office where a radioactive material will be injected into the joint space during an arthrogram procedure. You will then come back to the Cancer Center where you will be lying on a table and a special detector called a gamma camera will be placed close to the part of your body being imaged. You will be asked to walk around for a few hours to manipulate the joint area and then return for repeat images. The images taken by the gamma camera generally take about one half hour each visit. Occasionally the physician requests repeat imaging the next day. These images will also take about forty five minutes.

The images will be reviewed and the results will be sent to your physician. Your physician will discuss these results with you and explain what they mean in relation to your health.

Your questions and comments:
call (805) 563-5870.

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